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Scleral

Keratoconus and Coronavirus

Middle Aged Couple Multifocal ContactsKeratoconus refers to the thinning and elongation of the cornea, the transparent layers over the eye, into a cone-like shape. That results in blurred vision. Other symptoms include vision difficulties at night and objects appearing to have a glare or halos around them.

If you have keratoconus, several options are available.

For a mild or moderate condition, eyeglasses or soft contact lenses will help. Some people do better with rigid gas permeable (hard) contact lenses. If contact lenses hurt your cornea, scleral lenses are recommended. They vault over the cornea and rest on the sclera, the white part of the eye. For more severe cases of keratoconus, laser treatment and corneal transplants are recommended.

Hygiene for Scleral-Lens Wearers in the Coronavirus Era

As always, hygiene is paramount when you handle and wear scleral lenses, as it is with soft and hard lenses. This means thoroughly washing your hands before touching the lenses, and cleaning and rinsing the lenses with recommended solutions.

Wearing sclerals and other contact lenses during the coronavirus pandemic remains as safe as ever, but it’s even more important now to observe hygiene guidelines. In fact, you can take extra precautions to lower the risk of inadvertently transmitting the coronavirus to your eyes, from where it can enter your body.

Consider taking these additional preventative steps:

  • Use disinfectant wipes to clean the counters and other surfaces where you place the scleral-lens cases and solutions. This includes disinfecting the cases and containers of solutions before using.
  • Wash your hands before touching your eyes or removing your lenses.
  • Don’t touch the area on/near your eye and then someone else’s, or vice versa.
  • Avoid rubbing your eyes to prevent keratoconus from developing or worsening, while also reducing the risk of getting infected by coronavirus.

If you have keratoconus and are concerned about maintaining your optical health while reducing the risk of coronavirus, contact us.

The Scleral Lens Center At Washington Eye Doctors treats patients with keratoconus in Washington, D.C., Bethesda, Arlington, Chevy Chase, and throughout District of Columbia.

References:

Succeeding With Sclerals

Succeeding With ScleralsHealthy corneas normally bend incoming light toward the retina so we can see clearly. However, certain corneal conditions, such as keratoconus and astigmatism, lead the light’s path to the cornea to diffuse, resulting in reduced and blurred vision.

That’s precisely what happened to three patients: Ben, Georgette, and Fred, who have irregular corneas that caused them to struggle with their vision. Thanks to scleral lenses, they and countless other patients with corneal conditions have experienced improved visual clarity, sharper focus and unparalleled comfort. But before we delve into their stories, what are scleral lenses and how exactly do they benefit those with irregular corneas?

Irregular Corneas and Scleral Lenses

Irregularly shaped corneas are most commonly caused by or associated with astigmatism, keratoconus, prior eye surgeries (such as LASIK, cataracts, corneal transplant), trauma, scarring, and pellucid marginal degeneration.

Irregular corneas cannot be corrected with eyeglasses or traditional contact lenses. An excellent non-surgical solution is scleral lenses, which provide clear vision and better comfort while keeping your eyes hydrated throughout the day.

The lenses vault over the cornea and rest on the sclera, the white part of the eye, which prevents corneal irritation. The liquid reservoir fills in the surface irregularities of the cornea, restoring vision and enabling the eye to comfortably heal. The smooth optical surface replaces the distorted corneal surface, resulting in dramatically improved vision and comfort.

Read how scleral lenses have helped address Ben’s, Georgette’s, and Fred’s irregular corneas, and enabled them to experience improved vision and a higher quality of life.

*These patient testimonials are meant to reflect actual testimonials of patients but not necessarily our patients.

Everything Is Now in Focus for Ben

Ben entered college excited for life’s newest adventure. He made friends and studied hard. But his struggle to read the content on the classroom whiteboard and in his textbooks presented the same challenges he’d experienced for much of his life.

“Here we go again,” Ben thought. Ben had astigmatism, meaning that his corneas were unevenly curved. As a result, images and texts appeared blurry. To see clearly, he resorted to squinting, which, in turn, led to frequent headaches.

Although Ben had regularly been updating his eyeglass prescription over the years, and tried wearing standard contact lenses, he still struggled with his vision. “Enough is enough,” Ben decided. “It’s time to consult a vision expert!”

That’s when Ben went to see his eye doctor, who suggested he wear scleral lenses to help see clearly with his astigmatism.

The scleral lenses worked wonders by allowing Ben’s eyes to properly focus light to the retina. Several appointments with his eye doctor ensured that the scleral lenses were fit just right. Ben can now see clearly and effortlessly, read the board and his textbooks, all of which have enabled him to graduate from college with honors.

If you or your child have astigmatism, make your life easier by following in Ben’s steps and ask Dr. Michael Rosenblatt about scleral lenses.

For Georgette, Sclerals Are the Perfect Fit

Just imagine how Georgette felt, at age 15, when she was diagnosed with keratoconus.

No one wants to hear that their cornea is thinning and gradually bulging outward into a cone shape. But that’s exactly what happened to Georgette. Because keratoconus causes blurred vision and sensitivity to light, Georgette often found herself squinting to help her see clearly.

That’s when her eye doctor suggested scleral lenses. Having never worn contact lenses, Georgette hesitated, then reconsidered. “Let’s do it,” she concluded.

Georgette left her eye doctor with her new pair of custom-fit scleral lenses, fully excited at the prospect of experiencing a great vision. Thanks to sclerals, she not only sees clearly but now finds her eyes to be significantly less sensitive to light, which allows her to enjoy the outdoors during the day.

Fred Likes What He Sees Following His Corneal Transplant

“It still hurts,” Fred complained as he looked into his eyes in the mirror.

The corneal transplant he underwent 10 months earlier effectively addressed his corneal scars following a workplace accident. Fred recovered as the operation’s physical effects receded. Post-operative medications prevented not only inflammation and infection, but also the rejection of his newly transplanted corneas. However, the standard contact lenses he began using a few months after the transplant were painful to wear, and his irregular astigmatism—far from corrected—continued to cause fluctuating vision.

Imagine Fred’s excitement at learning that scleral lenses enable clear and painless vision for keratoplasty (corneal transplant) patients like himself. He read a 2016 study published in the Eye & Contact Lens journal that found that sclerals in post-keratoplasty patients are safe and effective, with most patients attaining 20/40 vision or better.

How did things turn out? With attentive care, really well. Fortunately, Fred now experiences both comfort and excellent vision with scleral lenses.

The Scleral Lens Center At Washington Eye Doctors offers scleral lenses to patients from Washington, D.C., Bethesda, Arlington, Washington, D.C., and throughout District of Columbia.

REFERENCES

When All Other Contacts Have Failed, Scleral Lenses May Be the Answer

Girl Beach Contact Lenses

Sclerals vs. Standard Lenses

Standard contact lenses — be they soft, rigid gas permeable, or disposable — are the most popular choice for people with refractive errors who don’t want to wear glasses. But because standard lenses rest directly on the cornea, they aren’t a good fit for people with very dry eyes or irregularly shaped corneas.

Patients who have an irregular cornea find scleral lenses to be ideal. They have a larger diameter than standard lenses that allows them to vault over the cornea and rest on the sclera (the white part of the eye). Because they form a dome over the cornea, scleral lenses protect it from scratches and abrasions.

Scleral lenses also store saline solution between the back of the lens and the front of the cornea. As a result, the eye’s surface stays lubricated, maximizing comfort. Vision remains reliable, too.

Because scleral lenses are larger than standard lenses and custom-fitted to the eye, they are more stable and less likely to pop out. Scleral lenses correct astigmatism even in people with highly irregular corneal surfaces.

Sclerals are often prescribed for patients who suffer from dry eye or other complications following LASIK or other corneal surgeries.

Because scleral lenses are custom made and comfort is paramount, they might require several visits to get the fit just right. To learn if you have a corneal condition that requires scleral lenses, visit The Scleral Lens Center At Washington Eye Doctors. We help patients from Washington, D.C., Bethesda, Arlington, Chevy Chase, and throughout District of Columbia.

References:

 

Scleral Lenses Can Prevent Dry Eye, Tiredness, and Discomfort

protect your eyes 640x350It’s not uncommon for certain contact lens wearers to suffer from eyes that feel dry, red, itchy, uncomfortable, and at times very painful. Eye drops and artificial tears can deliver relief, but they are no more than a temporary solution.

One of the best contact lenses for optimal comfort and hydration are scleral lenses, as they simultaneously provide vision correction, protect the eyes, and lubricate them.

What are Scleral Lenses?

These rigid gas permeable lenses have an extra-wide diameter that vaults over your whole cornea. In contrast to other contact lenses, they rest on the white part of your eyes (sclera) and not the cornea. As a result, scleral lenses consistently rank at the top of the charts when it comes to providing sharp visual acuity, comfort, and healthy eyes.

Common Contact Lens Complaints

Below we’ll explore the most common contact lens complaints we hear at our practice and ways scleral lenses can prevent them.

End-of-day tiredness and dry eyes

After just 6 to 8 hours of contact lens wear during the day, many contact lens wearers experience tired and dry eyes. Though standard hydrogel contact lenses allow a high concentration of oxygen to permeate the eye, some people need an alternative.

End-of-day eye discomfort can be resolved with scleral lenses, as these custom-designed lenses have a liquid reservoir between the lens and the cornea that provides a continuous moist environment that soothes tired, dry eyes.

Not only does this cushion of moisture lead to a comfortable wearing experience; it also promotes healthy eyes throughout the day, allowing you to wear these lenses for 12 to 14 hours! It is for this reason that many of our patients turn to scleral lenses for unparalleled comfort and all-day ocular hydration.

Chronic dry eye syndrome

Certain dry eye patients may experience painful, red, and swollen eyes. For them, traditional soft contact lenses can be unbearable because they sit right on the irritated cornea. Moreover, these contact lenses tend to act as sponges, soaking up the moisture from the surface of the eye.

If you struggle with dry eye syndrome and have been looking for a more effective treatment method beyond eyedrops and artificial tears, ask your The Scleral Lens Center At Washington Eye Doctors doctor about scleral lenses.

Feeling the contact lens in the eye

Feeling your contact lenses in your eyes often indicates a poor fitting. Everyone’s eyes are different and when it comes to contact lenses, no size fits all. Furthermore, if lenses are insufficiently curved, they can be dislodged with every blink. This isn’t just uncomfortable — the wrong size lens can damage your cornea.

Because scleral lenses have a large diameter and are custom-made to your eye shape and size, it is almost impossible for scleral lenses to dislodge during normal wear. And since these lenses do not make contact with the surface of your cornea, there is a decreased risk of corneal abrasions.

Operating in dusty environments

Dry, dusty or dirty conditions can cause contact lenses to not only dry out, but can also lead irritants to attach themselves to the lenses. Scleral lenses offer comfort, even in dusty or dirty environments. This is because the lenses cover a large area of the eye, and since the outer layer of the lens protects the eye surface, dust and tiny particles can’t reach it. While not a complete barrier, scleral lenses can provide you with more relief and all-day comfort than traditional lenses.

If you’ve tried traditional contact lenses and have experienced any of the above, or if you’re simply seeking a more comfortable alternative to wear all day, it’s worth considering scleral lenses.

Contact a knowledgeable and experienced eye care professional, Dr. Michael Rosenblatt, who will patiently assess and explain your condition to you. Dr. Michael Rosenblatt will perform a specialized scleral lens custom-fitting to ensure that you receive the best fit for optimal visual clarity and comfort.

Call the The Scleral Lens Center At Washington Eye Doctors today to schedule your consultation. We help patients from the Washington, D.C., Bethesda, Arlington, and Chevy Chase, in the District of Columbia area enjoy great vision and comfort with scleral lenses.

 

This Contact Lens Can Actually Treat Dry Eye Syndrome!

something in my eyeWearing traditional contact lenses can be a convenient method of correcting vision — unless you are suffering from dry eye. Dry eye symptoms, such as red, itchy eyes, or a feeling of having something in your eye, tend to worsen when wearing traditional contact lenses.

There is, however, one type of lens that isn’t only comfortable to wear, but also improves vision and reduces symptoms — it’s called a scleral lens. This lens differs from a conventional contact lens in several ways, most notably in size. Scleral lenses are large custom-fit contact lenses that offer multiple benefits for people with dry eyes and a variety of other eye conditions.

If you are experiencing dry eye symptoms, speak with Dr. Michael Rosenblatt to see whether wearing scleral lenses is the best course of action for your condition.

Dry Eye Symptoms

First things first, what does dry eye mean? If you’ve been experiencing any of these symptoms for some time, you may be suffering from dry eye syndrome:

  • Red eyes
  • Itchy eyes
  • Sensitivity to light
  • Mucus in or around your eyes
  • A feeling of dust or sand in your eyes
  • Difficulty wearing contact lenses
  • Watery eyes
  • Blurred vision or eye fatigue

Why Do the Symptoms Occur?

Your eyes are usually covered with a thin film of tears to keep them lubricated and protected. If the lubrication is inadequate, that is, if the quality or quantity of the tears is out of balance, one of the above symptoms may occur.

Dry eye can have many causes, such as certain medical conditions, medications, environmental influences, hormones, and extensive exposure to blue light from digital devices. Long-time contact lens usage may also impact tear quality. Dry eye mostly affects women, particularly upon reaching menopause.

What Are Scleral Lenses?

This gas permeable contact lens is considerably larger than any other contact lens, and due to its size, a scleral lens rests on the sclera—the white part of the eye— without touching the cornea.

As mentioned earlier, when you have dry eye, the cornea is more sensitive than usual, rendering it uncomfortable when a traditional contact lens comes into contact with it. Scleral lenses, on the other hand, cause no friction to the cornea as they do not directly touch it, but rather vault right over it.

Scleral lenses were initially developed for patients who could not wear traditional contact lenses, such as those with high astigmatism, keratoconus, and other corneal irregularities. Over the years, study after study has shown that scleral lenses can improve and even treat dry eye syndrome.

How Does a Scleral Lens Treat Dry Eye?

Standard soft contact lenses absorb moisture from the eye, whereas scleral lenses provide moisture. Furthermore, when inserting a scleral lens into your eye, you first apply a saline solution, which fills the gap between the cornea and the lens. This provides moisture for the irritated eye and promotes healing.

By ensuring consistent hydration of the eye and shielding the cornea from external irritants, scleral lenses provide the eye with the conditions needed to heal. As you can see, scleral lenses can play a therapeutic role in the healing process of dry eye syndrome.

What You Need to Know About Wearing Scleral Lenses With Dry Eye

Most people find that scleral lenses are very comfortable to wear. They do not move around on the eye, and dust particles are less likely to get caught underneath. Caring for, inserting and removing a larger lens, however, involves some practice and calls for a little more caution.

One of the few side effects of dry eye is a higher production of mucus, which can accumulate underneath the lens. As a result, you may have to clean your lenses more frequently to ensure clear vision.

Eye Drops and Scleral Lenses

Artificial tears are a common treatment for dry eye, and you can use them in combination with scleral lenses. However, make sure to consult Dr. Michael Rosenblatt regarding which drops to use for your specific case.

To further reduce symptoms and improve the quality of your tears, consider using lid scrubs regularly. Also, warm compresses can provide relief and contribute to improving the tear film.

Where Can You Get Scleral Lenses?

Scleral lenses are custom-made for each patient. At The Scleral Lens Center At Washington Eye Doctors, we have made scleral lens fitting one of our primary objectives, which is why our practice is equipped with the latest technology and contact lens modalities. This has enabled us to achieve positive results for our dry eye patients.

This Contact Lens Can Actually Treat Dry Eye Syndrome from EyeCarePro on Vimeo.

Contact Dr. Michael Rosenblatt at The Scleral Lens Center At Washington Eye Doctors for a personal consultation and find out whether scleral lenses are a suitable option for your dry eye syndrome.

We serve dry eye patients from Washington, D.C., Bethesda, Arlington, Chevy Chase, and throughout District of Columbia.

What Is the Shape of a Healthy Eye and How Does It Affect Vision?

eyes eye care 640x350The human eye is a biological piece of functional art, capable of producing colorful moving three-dimensional images with high precision. At the same time, one can marvel at the aesthetic beauty of the human eye and its shape.

The Shape of a Healthy Eye

In a healthy and perfectly shaped eye, light passes through the cornea and crystalline lens, and is accurately focused onto the retina, located at the back of the gel-filled eyeball. This process enables an image to be passed onto the optic nerve and then the visual cortex of the brain. Accurate focus and convergence depend on the proper shape of each part of the eye. However, eyeballs can be either shortened (hyperopia) or elongated (myopia).

Unhealthy Eye Shapes That Impact Vision

The Myopic Eye

In an elongated myopic eyeball, the distance between the lens and retina is too long, leading the image to come into focus before reaching the retina. As a result, the photosensitive cells of the retina pick up a blurry image.

The Hyperopic Eye

In hyperopia or farsightedness, the opposite is the case. The eyeball is too short, as is the distance that light travels from lens to retina. Therefore, the image comes into focus behind the retina, causing distant objects to appear clear, whereas close ones do not come into proper focus.

The Cornea

While the crystalline lens is flexible and auto-adjusts its shape for proper focus, the cornea is static. A healthy cornea maintains its smooth dome shape. However, if the cornea is weak, the structure of the cornea cannot hold this round shape, causing the cornea to bulge outward and downward like a cone. Perfect curvature of the cornea ensures the correct bending of incoming light onto the lens, whereas inadequate curvature results in a refractive error.

An uneven or irregularly shaped cornea also distorts the image that forms at the retina. Common corneal irregularities include astigmatism and keratoconus.

Keratocoonus Labelled

Scleral Lenses for a Smooth Eye Shape

Scleral lenses are large contact lenses that rest on the sclera — the white part of the eye. The lenses span over the cornea, making them ideal for a deformed cornea as they even out the irregularity to create a perfectly shaped eye.

Contact Dr. Michael Rosenblatt at The Scleral Lens Center At Washington Eye Doctors to learn more about how your eye shape affects your vision. We’ll be happy to discuss the different correction methods available that offer you sharp, comfortable and clear vision all day, every day.

We receive clients from Washington, D.C., Bethesda, Arlington, Chevy Chase, and throughout District of Columbia.

 

Resources:

https://www.lasikmd.com/blog/eye-shapes-affect-vision

https://www.everydayhealth.com/vision-center/the-healthy-eye/how-the-eye-works.aspx

https://www.nvisioncenters.com/eye-shapes/

https://www.nei.nih.gov/learn-about-eye-health/eye-conditions-and-diseases/refractive-errors

Ever Wonder How People See Following a Corneal Transplant?

Dry Eye Senior Woman 640×350For patients with a damaged cornea, corneal transplant surgery (also called keratoplasty) can help restore clear vision by replacing the original cornea with healthy corneal tissue from an organ donor.

Corneal damage can be caused by:

  • Corneal scarring from infection or injury
  • Keratoconus – an eye disease that causes the cornea to bulge
  • Corneal ulcers
  • Eye diseases, such as Fuch’s dystrophy
  • Clouding or swelling of the cornea
  • Complications following eye surgery

During surgery, either a portion of the cornea or the entire cornea is replaced with healthy tissue. Depending on the type of surgery, stitches may be needed. In all cases, however, a patch will be required to shield the recovering eye for 1-4 days after the procedure. Your doctor will instruct you on which medications to take and how to care for your eye in the days and weeks following the surgery.

If you require a corneal transplant or have already undergone the procedure, speak with Dr. Michael Rosenblatt or one of the knowledgeable staff members at The Scleral Lens Center At Washington Eye Doctors about how to safely regain clear vision after surgery.

How Is Vision Impacted After a Corneal Transplant?

Full recovery from the surgery may take up to a year, and sometimes longer. In the first few months after the procedure, your vision may even get worse before it gets better. As the eye adjusts to the new cornea, you may experience blurred or unstable vision, which will improve with time.

There is also a high chance of developing post-surgery refractive error— such as myopia or astigmatism — as the new cornea may have a different curvature than your original cornea. These refractive errors are generally corrected with either glasses, rigid gas-permeable (RGP) lenses, or scleral lenses. In many cases, scleral lenses are the better choice for post-keratoplasty, and for several reasons (explained below).

Why Are Scleral Lenses the Better Choice After Corneal Transplants?

Scleral lenses have a larger diameter than standard soft or gas-permeable lenses, making them more comfortable to wear while providing clear and stable vision. If there is a high variance in corneal curvature or even a slight elevation at the site of the transplant, RGP lenses may decenter, causing irritation and inflammation. Scleral contact lenses prevent this problem as they don’t sit directly on the cornea, but rather vault over it.

Furthermore, scleral lenses support the eye’s natural healing process due to the reservoir of fluid that sits between the cornea and the back of the lens. This keeps the eye in a constant state of hydration for optimal recovery.

Ever Wonder How People See Following a Corneal Transplant? from EyeCarePro on Vimeo.

Call The Scleral Lens Center At Washington Eye Doctors to find out more about scleral lenses and to determine whether they are right for you.

Dr. Michael Rosenblatt serves patients in Washington, D.C., Bethesda, Arlington, Chevy Chase, and throughout District of Columbia.

REFERENCES

https://www.allaboutvision.com/conditions/cornea-transplant.htm

https://www.reviewofcontactlenses.com/article/postkeratoplasty-consider-sclerals

https://www.webmd.com/eye-health/cornea-transplant-surgery#1

Scleral Lenses Help Even Dry Eyes!

woman applying eyedroppers, close upWhen it comes to having dry eyes, you’ve probably tried everything you can think of to get some relief. From artificial tears to medicated drops, and maybe even homeopathic remedies, nothing seems to give you long-term relief.

Until now.

Scleral lenses may just be the solution you’ve been looking for. At The Scleral Lens Center At Washington Eye Doctors, we can help alleviate your dry eye pain with custom-made scleral lenses.

What Are Scleral Lenses?

Like standard soft contact lenses, scleral lenses sit on your eyeball and correct refractive errors such as myopia (nearsightedness), hyperopia (farsightedness), and astigmatism. But that’s where the similarities end.

Scleral lenses are made with rigid materials, giving them a smooth, round shape that stays in place. They feature a large diameter, covering the entire area of the sclera (the white part of the eye), but without touching the surface of the cornea. This unique design allows for an ultra-comfortable fit.

But what really sets them apart from other contact lenses is the built-in reservoir of artificial tears, which provides a constant source of lubrication to the eyes.

Common Symptoms of Dry Eyes

woman wiping her eyes with a tissueDry eyes cause a number of painful symptoms. The most common signs of dry eye include:

  • Blurry vision
  • Burning sensation
  • Gritty feeling
  • Itchy eyes
  • Redness
  • Stinging
  • Soreness
  • Watery eyes

Scleral lenses are an excellent treatment option due their large shape, unique features, and customized fitting for each patient. Talk to Dr. Michael Rosenblatt to see if scleral lenses can help with your dry eye.

Scleral Lenses Can Treat Dry Eye

A tiny pool of solution inside the scleral lens is located in the space between the back surface of the lens and the front area of the cornea. As the cornea is coated with these artificial tears, it remains moisturized for longer stretches of time than basic contact lenses. In fact, most of our patients can wear scleral lenses comfortably for up to 14 hours. This results in continuous relief for dry, irritated, and scratchy eyes.

Are Scleral Lenses Right for You?

So how do you know if scleral lenses are the right choice? First, think about what you’ve been using until now. Maybe you apply a cool compress to ease the soreness or burning sensation. It feels better for a little while, but then the symptoms return. Maybe you keep a small bottle of artificial tears in your purse or pocket and use them whenever your eyes feel gritty or dry, but you find that happening more and more often. Have you been told that you’re a ‘hard to fit’ patient? Then perhaps it’s time for something different and tailor-made for you.

Why Are Scleral Lenses Custom-Made?

Woman Putting in ContactNo two patients are alike, and neither are their corneas. Like a fingerprint, each person’s cornea has unique curves and contours, which are even more pronounced when someone has a misshapen cornea. That’s why Dr. Michael Rosenblatt performs a specialized, custom-fitting, to ensure you receive the best fit for optimal visual clarity. Talk about a personalized experience!

Our scleral lens patients enjoy improved visual clarity, sharper focus, and relief for burning, red, and itchy eyes. If you’ve tried standard soft contact lenses or eye drops without any easing of your Dry Eye symptoms, it’s time to try something new. Say goodbye to Dry Eye pain and hello to long-lasting relief with scleral lenses.

Why Choose An Optometrist Who Specializes In Contacts Vs Ophthalmologists

Gril with dark-colored eyes, brown hairYou need new contact lenses or maybe you’re just trying them out for the first time. How do you know who to turn to for the best advice and the right fit?

At The Scleral Lens Center At Washington Eye Doctors, we specialize in contact lenses, especially for patients who may have difficulty wearing them due to eye disease, high refractive errors, misshapen corneas, and more.

Differences In Eyecare Professionals

Before knowing where to turn, it’s important to understand the difference in eye care professionals.

What Is An Ophthalmologist?

An ophthalmologist is a medical doctor who is licensed to practice medicine and perform vision-related surgical procedures. They receive years of advanced medical training to diagnose eye diseases and provide treatments, conduct scientific research on vision disorders, and prescribe medications for their patients.

Ophthalmologists could fit patients with eyeglasses and contacts, but often they refer to an optometrist on their team to correct patients’ refractive errors, such as myopia (nearsightedness), hyperopia (farsightedness), astigmatism, or presbyopia (farsightedness due to aging). Often, optometrists are the ones who screen patients for LASIK candidacy and will work alongside LASIK surgeons to coordinate the surgery.

What Is An Optometrist?

An optometrist is a healthcare professional who is licensed to provide vision care. This typically involves eye exams, vision tests, and diagnoses of eye diseases and conditions. Optometrists specialize in fitting patients with glasses or contacts for common refractive errors, while ophthalmologists focus on their areas of expertise

Why Choose An Optometrist?

Happy girl with fingers near eyesWhile an ophthalmologist is ideal for the treatment of severe eye diseases, vision disorders, and eye surgery, an optometrist is ideal for contact lenses. That’s because general vision care is the primary service that they offer their patients.

Think of your optometrist like a primary care physician for your eyes. When you need an eye checkup, if you notice your vision changing, or if your child isn’t seeing the board clearly in school, that’s when you visit the optometrist.

Getting The Right Fit

Contact lens fittings are one of the most common eye care-related services. In fact, the CDC (The United States Centers for Disease Control and Prevention) estimates that 45 million Americans wear contact lenses, which means there are a lot of people getting fitted for contacts.

Whether you’re a first-time lens wearer or you’ve recently had a prescription change, it’s essential to ensure proper fit. Improper fitted lenses are not only uncomfortable, they can lead to vision problems, infections, or scarring. That’s where we come in.

First, Dr. Michael Rosenblatt will perform a detailed eye exam to check your level of refractive error, and if you’re an existing patient, to see if your prescription has changed. The doctor will also check for any conditions that could interfere with contact lenses. The shape of your eye and personal lifestyle are also important factors. So if you spend more time outdoors or in more active environments, that may require a different lens type. The doctor will ensure the best fit for your eye and overall visual health.

Your optometrist will teach you how to put the lenses in and take them out, how to properly clean and store them, and other general care tips. Additional follow-up may be needed as we monitor the condition of your lenses and your prescription needs.

Can My Child Wear Contacts?

Little girl with blue eyesChildren can wear contact lenses, depending on their age and level of responsibility. Contacts may be a good solution for kids with vision problems, especially among the teen and tween set who tend to be more concerned over their appearance. Contacts are generally recommended for kids between the ages of 11-14, but it’s always recommended to speak with your eye doctor for any specific questions.

Let us know how we can help with your contact lens wear. Contact The Scleral Lens Center At Washington Eye Doctors for a consultation today.

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