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How To Prevent “Mask Fog” on Your Glasses

If you wear glasses and a face mask, you’ve probably struggled with “mask fog.”  Your lenses get all misty, requiring you to wipe your eyewear throughout the day. Below are a few strategies to help you prevent your eyeglasses from fogging up when wearing a mask.

But First, Why Do Glasses Fog Up? 

Quite simply, condensation forms whenever moist warm air hits a cool surface. Your specs fog up when the mask directs your warm breath upward instead of in front of you — which is great for preventing virus transmission but bad for anyone with less-than-stellar eyesight.

Is Your Mask Well Fitted? 

The mask should fit securely over your nose. Ideally, you’ll want to wear a mask with a nose bridge or one that can be shaped or molded to your face. When the mask fits properly, hopefully most of your breath will go through it, not out the top or sides.

Use Your Glasses To Seal the Top of Your Mask

This method works best with large, thick eyewear frames. By pulling your mask up higher on your nose and placing the lower part of your eyeglasses on the mask, you can get a snug fit that blocks your warm breath from escaping upward toward your eyewear.

Tape Your Mask to Your Face

You can always use tape to secure your mask across the bridge of your nose and the top of your cheeks. Use easy-to-remove tape, including adhesive, medical, or athletic. Just be  sure to stay away from duct tape. 

Soap and Water Help Prevent Fogging

This trick is one that healthcare professionals regularly turn to. All you need for this hack is soapy water (dish soap works best) and a microfiber cloth. Stay away from soaps with lotions in them as they can leave a thick residue, making it even harder to see.

Simply rub both sides of your lenses with a drop of soap, then buff the lenses with a soft microfiber cloth. This effective trick helps prevent your lenses from fogging up as a transparent, thin film of soap acts as a barrier. 

Anti-Fog Wipes and Sprays 

Another option is to purchase wipes and sprays designed to tackle foggy lenses. Read the fine print, as certain anti-fog solutions may not work as well, or may even damage lenses with  coatings that minimize glare and fingerprint smudges, for example. 

 

To learn more about ways to keep your glasses from fogging while wearing a mask, contact Washington Eye Doctors in Washington, D.C. today.

 

Why Do People Wear Reading Glasses?

Your Washington, D.C. optometrist explains who needs reading glasses, and how to choose the right pair for you.

Eyeglasses are the most common type of vision correction for people of all ages. They give a sharper view of the world, upgrading your quality of life. Wearing eyeglasses can also help you to avoid eye strain and all the uncomfortable symptoms associated with it.

There are two primary types of eyeglasses – distance glasses and reading glasses, both of which help you to focus on objects. However, they don’t achieve the same goals.

Distance glasses are intended to help people with myopia (nearsightedness) to see faraway objects more clearly. In contrast, reading glasses are worn generally by people with presbyopia, an age-related vision condition that causes the eye’s lens to lose flexibility. Presbyopia reduces the quality of near vision and reading glasses improve the ability to see something up close, such as a smartphone, computer screen, or book.

Who needs reading glasses?

Our Washington, D.C. optometrist fits almost every patient over age 40 with reading glasses at some point. Typically, you’ll know you need them when you start having trouble reading small print, especially in dim lighting and when you’re tired. If pushing the object further from your face brings it into sharper focus, it’s a relatively sure sign that you have presbyopia and could benefit from reading glasses.

How do you know which reading glasses to buy?

All reading glasses are made from convex lenses, which makes near objects look clearer. Non-prescription reading glasses are sold widely with generic strengths from +1 to +4, and people must use trial-and-error to find their optimal lens correction. Also, these over-the-counter reading glasses are typically constructed from lower quality materials than the eyeglasses sold by your local optometrist. As a result, the lenses usually cause more distortions.

For reading glasses that provide ideal vision, it’s best to have an eye exam to determine your precise prescription. Also, customized reading eyeglasses are much more appropriate for people with astigmatism, myopia, or an unequal lens strength in each eye.

We also recommend having an experienced optician check the fit of your reading glasses to ensure that your frames sit on your face properly and suit your lifestyle needs.

Can I wear contact lenses with reading glasses?

Yes, this can be an effective vision solution for some people. If you wear contact lenses for nearsightedness and also have presbyopia, putting on a pair of reading glasses over your contacts for short-term use can be a helpful way to read small print or do tasks up-close.

How do I know what style of reading glasses is right for me?

Our Washington, D.C. optometrist strongly suggests selecting reading glasses that fit your face shape and complement your sense of fashion. Because if you aren’t happy with the way you look in them, you won’t wear them!

Do you have memories of grandma sitting with reading glasses perched on her nose or hanging from a chain? Once upon a time, reading glasses came in only a few dated designs. Nowadays, there’s a fabulous range of flattering styles to choose from, ranging from small traditional wire frames to larger, chunky eyeglasses in bold colors. Browse the collection at our Washington, D.C. optical store to find a few pairs of readers to coordinate with your different outfits and moods!

At Washington Eye Doctors, we put your family’s needs first. Talk to us about how we can help you maintain healthy vision. Call us today: 202-335-5032 or book an appointment online to see one of our Washington, D.C. eye doctors.

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6 Signs You May Need Glasses

Many people don’t realize they have a vision problem. Perhaps they’ve gone years without glasses and haven’t noticed the gradual change in their vision. Or they’ve noticed a change, but put off a visit to an eye doctor. Regardless of whether you’re experiencing problems, make an appointment with Dr. Michael Rosenblatt to maintain your eye health. 

 

There are many clues that your eyesight needs correcting, such as struggling to read up close, or having trouble seeing street signs, or barely deciphering faces while watching a film. If you’re still not sure you need glasses, consider these 6 questions. 

 

Are You Frequently Squinting and/or Experiencing Headaches? 

 

Unless it’s unusually bright, there’s no reason to be squinting if your vision is clear. Although squinting may briefly enhance your eyes’ ability to focus, if done for too long it can tax your  eyes and surrounding muscles, which can result in frequent headaches. 

 

If you have to squint while working on your computer or using digital devices, you may be experiencing not only headaches but also digital eye strain or computer vision syndrome. The cure is often a pair of computer glasses, or blue light glasses, which are designed to block out or filter blue light. This can reduce headaches and squinting when using your digital devices. 

 

Are You Struggling to See Up Close? 

 

If the texts on your phone or restaurant menu look blurry, you may be farsighted. While reading glasses are a great option for near tasks, you’ll need to take them off for other activities.  Consider getting progressive lenses, which change gradually from point to point on the lens, providing the exact lens power needed for seeing objects clearly at any distance. Progressive lenses help you comfortably see near, far, and in-between all day long. 

 

Do You Struggle to See Things at a Distance?  

 

If you’re having difficulty seeing objects at a distance, you may be myopic (nearsighted).  Myopia is the most common cause of impaired vision in children and young adults. Consider a pair of glasses with high-index lenses, which are thinner and lighter than other lenses, along with anti-reflective coating. 

 

Do You Have Blurred Vision at Night?  

 

Are objects or signs more blurry at night? Do you experience halos or glare around lights while driving at night? These may be symptoms of a vision issue, such as myopia — though they can also be attributed to more serious ocular conditions, such as cataracts and glaucoma. To know the cause, get your eyes properly evaluated by Dr. Michael Rosenblatt. 

 

If determined that it is indeed myopia, consider getting prescription glasses with anti-glare or anti-reflective (AR) coating, as they allow more light in and also cut down on glare. This can dramatically improve night vision and help you see more clearly when driving at night. 

 

Are You Experiencing Double Vision?

 

If you’ve been experiencing double vision, contact Dr. Michael Rosenblatt, who will get to the root of the problem and provide you with a diagnosis. Double vision may be due to crossed eyes (strabismus), or a corneal irregularity, such as keratoconus, or another medical condition.

 

If you are diagnosed with any of these, you’ll likely need a pair of glasses with a prism correction that helps correct alignment issues. Special lenses prevent you from seeing double by combining two images into a single one.

 

However, note that if you experience sudden double vision, it may be a medical emergency that should be checked by an eye doctor immediately.

 

Are You Losing Your Place or Using Your Finger When Reading? 

 

If you’re frequently losing your spot or skipping lines when reading, you may have a vision problem. This could be due to strabismus, lazy eye, or astigmatism. 

 

The Importance of Regular Eye Exams

 

If you’re experiencing any of the symptoms listed above, it is essential to have a highly qualified optometrist examine your eyes to assess your vision and check for any eye diseases — and to do so as soon as possible. This is the only way to determine whether you need glasses or if something else is causing the problem. 

 

Even if you’re not experiencing any symptoms, it’s important to routinely get your eyes checked. Many eye diseases can be effectively treated before you notice major problems, so regular eye exams are important to maintain eye health. Contact Washington Eye Doctors in Washington, D.C. to make an appointment with Dr. Michael Rosenblatt. The sooner you get your vision checked, the faster you’ll be able to see clearly and enjoy a higher quality of life. 

What’s the Best Way to Clean Your Eyeglasses?

Did you know that about 50% of all Americans wear corrective glasses? With eyeglasses being so popular, you might assume people would know how to take care of their optical lenses properly, right? Wrong! When surveyed, most eyeglasses wearers respond that they clean their lenses by exhaling onto them and wiping the fog off with their shirt.

Unfortunately, this all-too-common practice can actually damage your eyeglasses. Our experts at Washington Eye Doctors, with optical stores in Washington, D.C., , , , , District of Columbia, share the following tips on the best way to clean your glasses.

Eyesight is precious. So are your eyeglasses.

Everyone appreciates the value of clear vision and the importance of doing everything possible to keep your vision safe and healthy. If you think of your eyeglasses as an investment towards your sharp vision, you’ll treat them with the care they deserve.

In addition to purchasing frames for your prescription eyeglasses, you may have chosen to coat the lenses with anti-glare, UV protection, and anti-scratch features. While these coatings are generally durable, they aren’t 100% damage-proof. Cleaning your lenses improperly can cause minor scratches.

What’s the worst way to clean eyeglasses?

The following cleaning solutions or methods rank as the absolute worst ways to treat your eyeglasses, because they can strip the lenses of their coatings and leave fine marks that can create a visual haze.

  • Window/glass cleaner
  • Ammonia
  • Bleach
  • Vinegar or lemon juice
  • Toothpaste
  • Tissues or napkins
  • Paper towels
  • Exhaling onto the lenses
  • Your shirt

What are the best ways to clean eyeglasses?

Keeping your lenses clean and clear is an essential part of optimizing your vision! The best cleansers to use include water, rubbing alcohol, dishwashing liquid, microfiber cloth, and special optical wipes.

Once you’re armed with the right substances, follow these guidelines:

  1. Run your glasses under lukewarm water (NOT hot water).
  2. Using a small drop of dish soap on your fingertips, rub both sides of the lenses and nose pads gently.
  3. Rinse the eyeglasses with warm water and dry gently with a clean microfiber cloth. Because microfiber doesn’t leave lint behind, your lenses should be sparkling clean.
  4. Keep individually-wrapped optical wipes handy so you can clean your eyeglasses throughout the day, as needed. Alternatively, spritz glasses cleaner or even rubbing alcohol from a spray bottle onto the lenses and wipe with a microfiber cloth.

We offer a full line of optical products

Need to stock up on wipes or a spray bottle of solution made especially for cleaning your glasses? Stop by our vision care centers in Washington, D.C., , , , , District of Columbia, to make sure you have all the quality eyewear products and accessories you need!

At Washington Eye Doctors, we put your family’s needs first. Talk to us about how we can help you maintain healthy vision. Call us today: 202-335-5032 or book an appointment online to see one of our Washington, D.C. eye doctors.

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How to Disinfect Glasses to Help Prevent COVID-19

Coronavirus and Your Eyeglasses

Did you know that our glasses (this includes the lenses and the frame) can potentially transfer viruses, such as COVID-19, to our eyes, nose, and mouth? This is because viruses — as well as bacteria — are easily transferred from our surroundings to our hands and then from our hands to our glasses.

In fact, research has shown that coronavirus can remain on glass surfaces for as long as 9 days. If we’re not careful, we can easily touch our glasses then touch our eyes, nose, or mouth, thus continuing the contagion cycle.

The danger is even higher for people with presbyopia, age-related farsightedness that generally affects those aged 40 and above. Presbyopes who wear reading glasses tend to put them on and take them off several times throughout the day. What’s more worrisome is that this age group is at higher risk for more serious complications from COVID-19.

The good news is that disinfecting your glasses is easy! Let’s delve into ways you should and should not disinfect your lenses at home.

What NOT to Use to Cleanse Your Glasses

Many of us may have rubbing-alcohol at home, and although it may seem like a perfectly good idea to use it to disinfect your specs, we discourage you from doing so. It may be too harsh for your eyeglasses, especially if you have any special coatings on your lenses.

Other products you should stay away from include ammonia, bleach, or anything with high concentrations of acid, such as lemon juice or vinegar, which can damage lens coatings and some eyewear materials.

How to Safely Disinfect Your Glasses

Now that we’ve eliminated the substances and chemicals that should not be used on your lenses, let’s see what is safe to use to clean eyewear.

Dish Soap and Water

The absolute easiest and most efficient way to disinfect and clean your lenses is to use lukewarm water with a gentle dish soap. Massage the soap onto each lens, rinse, and dry using a microfiber cloth (not paper towels, as the fibers can easily scratch lenses). While you’re at it, don’t forget to include your frame’s nose pads and earpieces.

Lens Cleaning Wipes

Pre-moistened lens wipes are excellent for cleaning your glasses, as well as your phone, tablet and computer screen. They remove bacteria, dust, dirt and germs from your glasses and the formula restores shine to glass surfaces without leaving any streaks or residue. The durable material is tough enough to remove stains, while being gentle enough not to scratch your screens or lenses. Contact Washington Eye Doctors to find out how you can access these.

So, In Summary:

  • Do not use rubbing alcohol to disinfect your glasses.
  • Avoid using household cleaners or products with high concentrations of acid.
  • Clean your glasses with a gentle dish soap and lukewarm water, or lens wipes.
  • Dry your glasses with a microfiber cloth to prevent smudging and scratching.

Disinfecting your glasses shouldn’t be stressful or worrisome. Just follow the easy steps above to protect your lenses and your health.

On behalf of everyone at Washington Eye Doctors in Washington, D.C., District of Columbia, we sincerely hope you and your loved ones stay healthy and safe during this uncertain time.

Do Your Glasses Always Fog Up in Winter?

9 Tips for Preventing Fog On Your Eyeglasses

Foggy eyeglasses are a part of life for many people. Sports sunglasses and snowboard goggles often fill with condensation in response to frigid air, and even regular prescription lenses can fog up just because you’re sipping a hot drink in the cold outdoors. Why does this happen? Our opticians in Washington, D.C. and , District of Columbia, explain what’s going on – and provide helpful tips on how to prevent your eyeglasses from fogging up.

Condensation is the cause

When moist heat, such as your breath or humidity in the atmosphere lands on a cold surface, such as your chilled eyeglasses lenses, it cools and transforms into tiny drops of liquid. These droplets, called condensation, create the film that you see as fog.

9 tips for stopping your eyeglasses from fogging up

  1. Anti-fog wipes: this is the easiest fix. The disadvantage of this simple hack is that you have to bring your wipes with you everywhere you go. Stock up on anti-fog wipes at our optical stores in Washington, D.C. and , District of Columbia.
  2. Anti-fog spray or cream: just like the wipes, anti-fog spray or cream also works well; it’s just a bit less convenient than the wipes.
  3. Clean eyeglasses with shaving cream: apply a small amount of shaving cream on both sides of your lenses, and wipe it off gently with a soft cloth and cold water.
  4. Spread white soap on your lenses: if you don’t have a can of shaving cream handy, white bar soap works as a good alternative. But don’t rinse the soap off with water. Instead, brush it off gently with a dry cloth until your lenses sparkle.
  5. Wipe lenses with saliva: this may be the fastest, cheapest way to prevent fog on your lenses. However, it can also lead to visual distortions, so don’t apply this fix right during sports.
  6. Eyeglasses that fit further from your face: some designs of frames sit further away from your face, providing better ventilation that can prevent condensation because the airborne water evaporates more quickly.
  7. Water-repellent lens coating: purchase eyeglasses with lenses coated with a water-repellent lens coating. The drawback of this solution is that it may prevent you from adding other types of lens coatings.
  8. Anti-fog sports eyeglasses: if you’re an avid outdoors person in the winter, you’ll benefit from buying a specialized pair of sports eyewear; check out our optical collection in Washington, D.C. and , District of Columbia.
  9. Take off your scarf: depending on the material of your winter scarf, it may be deflecting your breath upwards, where the warm air gets trapped behind your eyeglasses and leads to fog.

Note: these tips are for eyeglasses only; never use wipes, saliva, shaving cream or anything other than contact solution on contact lenses.

De-fog your vision

Whether you live in a very cold climate or you spend a lot of time engaged in winter sports, we can help clear the fogginess from your view. We offer a variety of vision solutions at Washington Eye Doctors, so stop by anytime to discuss the best anti-fog tips for your lifestyle.

At Washington Eye Doctors, we put your family’s needs first. Talk to us about how we can help you maintain healthy vision. Call us today: 202-335-5032 or book an appointment online to see one of our Washington, D.C. eye doctors.

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Is There a Cure for Nearsightedness?

Our Washington, D.C., District of Columbia, eye doctors explain what can be done about myopia in kids

Many parents wonder if there is a cure for nearsightedness, also known as myopia. Or maybe there’s a treatment to eliminate a child’s need for stronger glasses each year?

In response – there is presently no scientific evidence to back up the claims of various miracle treatments to cure myopia. Programs that attest to the power of eye exercises to reverse myopia and naturally treat nearsightedness are not supported by any well-designed independent research.

However, many recent studies do suggest that kids’ myopia can be controlled (not cured) by slowing its progression. An eye exam is the first necessary step to determine your child’s candidacy for myopia control. At Washington Eye Doctors, our eye doctors perform thorough pediatric eye exams to assess whether myopia control is recommended.

Myopia is not an eye disease

Nearsightedness is a refractive error caused by the elongation of the eyeball. Due to this elliptical shape, light that enters the eye doesn’t focus on the retina at the back of the eye. Instead, light is focused in front of the retina, thereby blurring the sight of any objects in the distance. Prescription glasses and contact lenses offer effective treatment for nearsightedness, but they are not a cure – and they don’t prevent myopia from getting worse.

Intro to myopia control

Myopia control treatments can lead to changes in the structure and focusing ability of the eye, thereby slowing the progression of myopia. Why is this important? Because myopia control can help prevent your child from developing high levels of nearsightedness, which not only require thick eyeglasses lenses – but have also been linked to serious eye problems later in life, such as a detached retina and cataracts.

Types of myopia control

At our Washington, D.C., District of Columbia, eye care center, we administer kids’ eye exams gently and comprehensively to diagnose their precise vision prescription and determine the most suitable type of myopia control.

Currently, there are four types of myopia control treatment in use:

1.Orthokeratology

Ortho-k lenses are specialized rigid gas permeable contacts that are worn only while sleeping. They correct refractive error by gently reshaping the cornea temporarily. Typically, ortho-k is used to enable people with nearsightedness to see clearly during the daytime – without any prescription eyewear. But eye doctors are increasingly using orthokeratology as a means for myopia control in kids. Studies suggest that myopic kids who wear ortho-k lenses for a few years may have less myopia as adults, in contrast to children who wear regular glasses or contacts during the years when myopia can progress rapidly.

2.Multifocal Contact Lenses

Multifocal contact lenses have different lens powers in different zones. While the conventional use of multifocal contacts is to correct presbyopia, eye care professionals have found that these specialty lenses can also be an effective method of myopia control for kids.

3.Multifocal Eyeglasses

Multifocal glasses are another option for controlling nearsightedness in children, but the results are not as impressive as with other types of myopia control.

4.Prescription eye drops

Prescription eye drops can be used to relax the eye’s focusing mechanism, thereby controlling myopia. Research studies have shown that during the first year of treatment with prescription eye drops, the progression of nearsightedness dropped by an average of 81%. However, the effects seem to diminish after the first year of treatment. Prescription eye drops are also associated with specific uncomfortable side effects, which is one reason why many eye doctors are hesitant to prescribe this treatment for kids.

Eye exams enable early detection of nearsightedness

The best way for your kid to benefit from myopia control is to diagnose nearsightedness as early as possible! Even if a child isn’t complaining about any visual problems, regular pediatric eye exams are critical – especially if there’s a family history of nearsightedness. The sooner myopia is detected, the sooner our Washington, D.C., District of Columbia, eye doctors can assess candidacy for myopia control.

At Washington Eye Doctors, we put your family’s needs first. Talk to us about how we can help you maintain healthy vision. Call us today: 202-335-5032 or book an appointment online to see one of our Washington, D.C. eye doctors.

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Nearsightedness & Farsightedness – What Do They Mean?

Your Washington, D.C., District of Columbia, eye doctor explains

Nearsightedness and farsightedness, officially termed myopia and hyperopia – respectively, are both refractive vision conditions. That means they are both caused by refractive errors, which are ocular disorders that affect the eye’s ability to properly focus light on the retina. The retina is the membrane that forms the back layer of the eyeball.

Nearsightedness occurs when the light that enters the eye falls short of the retina. Typically, this happens because the eyeball is elongated. As a result, objects in the distance look blurry to people with myopia. However, vision of near objects remains unaffected. Nearsightedness generally develops during childhood, deteriorates during the teenage years, and stabilizes once the person reaches young adulthood.

Farsightedness is basically the opposite of nearsightedness. Usually, it results from having an eyeball that is too short. As a result, light is focused behind the retina instead of directly on it. For people with mild to moderate farsightedness, close objects appear blurred, while objects in the distance are still sharp. However, high amounts of farsightedness may interfere with clear vision at all distances. Children are typically born farsighted, but as they grow and develop, their eyeballs lengthen and the hyperopia decreases.

Diagnosis of myopia and hyperopia – visit an eye doctor near you

While nearsightedness and farsightedness can cause symptoms, such as headaches, squinting, eye strain, and fatigue, these symptoms alone are not sufficient for making a firm diagnosis.

Both of these vision conditions can be detected during an eye exam performed by a qualified eye doctor. As a part of every eye exam, visual acuity will be tested. You will need to read a basic Snellen eye chart, and your eye doctor will test refraction in order to determine your precise vision prescription for glasses or contact lenses.

Treatment for nearsightedness and farsightedness

Corrective eyeglasses and contact lenses are both effective ways to treat nearsightedness and farsightedness. The prescription lenses work by altering the path of light as it bends into the eyes.

When children experience progressive myopia, a variety of methods for myopia control may be suitable. Myopia control treatment can eliminate the need to buy new glasses or contacts yearly, and it can help reduce children’s risk for eye disease in the future. To find out about your child’s candidacy for myopia control, consult a qualified eye doctor and book an eye exam near you.

It is common for myopia and hyperopia to stabilize once people reach their twenties. Once that occurs, refractive laser surgeries – such as LASIK and PRK – become options for treatment. These procedures can permanently resolve nearsightedness and farsightedness by reshaping the cornea to focus light properly on the retina.

Can vision therapy help with nearsightedness and farsightedness?

Clear and fully functional vision depends on more than just sharp visual acuity. Eyesight, the brain, and visual pathways all need to work in sync with each other. When this doesn’t happen, a person can find it difficult to see – even with 20/20 vision. That’s where the role of vision therapy enters the picture.

Vision therapy helps people with particular eye conditions develop the visual skills needed for clear sight, such as:

  • Strabismus (crossed eyes)
  • Amblyopia (lazy eye)
  • Computer vision
  • Traumatic brain injury (TBI)
  • Learning related visual problems (poor eye teaming and focusing)
  • Sports vision improvement

Optic devices and custom-designed exercises are used to strengthen the eye-brain connection, so eye mobility is enhanced. The person learns how to efficiently process visual cues that the eyes send to the brain. Therefore, vision therapy will not help to treat a refractive vision condition, such as nearsightedness and farsightedness.


At Washington Eye Doctors, we put your family’s needs first. Talk to us about how we can help you maintain healthy vision. Call us today: 202-335-5032 or book an appointment online to see one of our Washington, D.C. eye doctors.

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How to Keep Glasses from Getting Foggy

Whether you live in a cold climate or have visited one in the winter, you have probably seen someone who just walked in from the cold outdoors sporting glasses that are no longer transparent, or perhaps you’ve experienced it yourself.

Why Do Glasses Fog Up?

There are several factors that cause your glasses to fog up — one of which is ambient heat, in other words, the actual temperature in your surrounding environment. Eyelashes that touch the lens can cause fogging, as well as tight-fitting frames that touch the cheeks (many plastic frames cause this problem), which impede proper airflow. Lastly, high humidity and the sweat and moisture that accompany overexertion/ exercise can also trigger foggy lenses. 

Ultimately, glasses cloud over due to moisture in the air condensing on the cold surface of your lenses. 

Now that you know the most common reasons why your glasses fog up, it’s time to read about some possible solutions. Below are a few tips to help keep your lenses clear year-round.

6 Tips to Steer Clear of Cloudy Specs 

1. Invest in Anti-Fog Coating

Anti-fog coating blocks out moisture that would normally stick to your lenses, by creating a surface layer that repels water and mist. An optician applies the treatment to both sides of the lens in order to prevent fogging so you can see clearly in any climate or environment.

Ask us about our proven anti-fog treatment for your glasses and be on your way to clearer vision, all the time.

2. Use Anti-Fog Wipes, Sprays, or Creams

Commercial anti-fog products are an alternative to lens coatings. These products, typically sold in either gel or spray form, are specially designed to prevent condensation and moisture from building up on your lenses. Apply the product as directed on the packaging and remove it with the supplied cloth, wipe or towelette. If a cloth wasn’t included in the box, use a scratch-free cloth.

Aside from the gel or spray, you can use anti-fog wipes. These pre-treated napkins are perfect for those who are on the go. 

3. Move Your Glasses Further Away from Your Face

Eyeglasses tend to trap moisture and heat, particularly if they are positioned close to your eyes or face, which increases the buildup of fog on your lenses. Consider adjusting the position of your eyewear by pushing your glasses slightly further down your nose. It will stimulate proper air circulation, thereby reducing fog accumulation.

4. Wear Your Seasonal Accessories Wisely

If the weather cools down, try not to wear too many layers, to prevent overheating and producing sweat, which can make your glasses to fog up more. Wear only the necessary amount of clothing to stay warm. If you’re wearing a scarf, consider one with an open weave or a more breathable material to let the air pass through. 

5. Avoid Abrupt Temperature Changes

Allow your eyewear to acclimate to changes in temperature. If you are moving from an environment that is cold into one which is warm and humid, try to let your glasses adjust accordingly. 

For instance: 

  • As you enter a building, stand in the doorway for a minute or two as the temperature slowly transitions from cool to warm. 
  • When in the car, gradually adjust the heat, particularly when your hands aren’t free to simply remove your glasses and wipe off the fog.

Fogged up glasses are not only irritating but can also be dangerous, especially for those who drive, ski, or operate machinery. So make sure to take the necessary precautions, especially as the weather changes. 

6. Swap Glasses for Contact Lenses

If contacts are an option for you, you might want to wear them on those cold days, to avoid foggy glasses syndrome (yeah, that’s a made-up term).

 

Want to keep your glasses from fogging up? Speak with Dr. Michael Rosenblatt. At Washington Eye Doctors in Washington, D.C., we can advise you about a variety of contact lenses, anti-fog treatment and other solutions to help you see clearly— any day. 

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